UC Clermont Represented at the 3rd World Congress on New Technologies in Rome

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This year, a scientific conference known as the 3rd World Congress on New Technologies was held in Rome. Researchers from across the globe had a chance to meet and exchange ideas from their research projects. Many students, post-docs, and professors held oral presentations on their work, while others created posters displaying information. The University of Cincinnati and Clermont College were well represented at this conference. Professor Cliff Larrabee, student Alyssa Amato, and I attended and shared our research projects with the scientists present at the congress.

The congress was held at the Barceló Aran Mantenga hotel in Rome, Italy from June 6 to June 8. The congress itself was made up of four separate conferences: the 8th International Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications; the 7th International Conference on Environmental Pollution and Remediation; the 3rd International Conference on Biotechnology and Bioengineering; and the International Conference on Energy Research and Technology. Those in attendance could choose to attend any of the lectures that caught their interest. I was fortunate enough to be a part of the nanotechnology conference and orally present the work I had done over the past year. I have been a College Credit Plus (CCP) student at the Clermont campus for two years; during this time, I have had the opportunity to work on research with Dr. Cliff Larrabee, a professor in chemistry at the campus. I presented findings from my paper The Effect of a Clathrate-Forming Counterion on Micellar Solubilization, which was also co-authored by Dr. Larrabee.

The purpose of my research was to determine the hydrophobicity of tetrabutylammonium 10-undecenoate, which would indicate its effectiveness as an encapsulation around a hydrophobic treatment drug. This work, however, is only a small piece of the entire project. The overall goal of the research is to create a model targeted drug delivery system that will protect healthy cells from cancer treatment drugs. In the future, there is a hope that this system will be able to be used clinically, providing healthier treatment options for cancer patients. Dr. Larrabee has spent many years working on this project and has mentored numerous students through the Women in Science and Engineering Program at UC, research grants, and independent studies. Alyssa Amato had done work with Dr. Larrabee through an independent study, and had researched the differences between micelle-based and vesicle-based drug delivery systems.

During my stay in Rome, I had the opportunity to visit many of the attractions that people all around the world dream of seeing. The Colosseum, the Vatican, the Trevi Fountain, and the Spanish Steps were a few of the locations I had the privilege to tour. I was able to see many of the famous tourist attractions within the first day of the trip. Many of these photos, along with photos from the conference, can be found in the following photo essay.

During the remaining days of the trip, we ate pizza, got gelato, visited a crypt, and attended different presentations. I had the opportunity to increase my knowledge of nanotechnology and its biological applications, as well as gain perspective on international environmental issues. Around one hundred people registered for the conference to present their work, and these presenters were from all corners of the world. Because of the diverse group that attends the congress, the location is different every year; in 2018 it will be held in Madrid, Spain. For more information, you can visit http://newtechcongress.com.

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About Author

Emily Ogle is a junior biochemistry and chemistry major at UC, concentrating in pre-medical sciences. She keeps herself busy working on research, writing for The Lantern, and getting as involved as possible in campus activities.

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